September 2, 2014

10 Investigative Journalism Fellowships Offered to Cover HIV/AIDS in South Africa

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The International Women’s Media Foundation (IWMF) is offering 10 journalists fellowships to produce investigative reports on the HIV/AIDS epidemic in South Africa.

Nearly 6 million South Africans are suffering from HIV – among them 3.2 million women and 280,000 children, UNAIDS estimates.

With funding from M•A•C AIDS Fund, the project will offer 10 experienced South African reporters one-on-one coaching with media trainers and stipends to conduct interviews and in-depth research. The M•A•C AIDS Fund has donated more than $8 million to HIV/AIDS programs in South African in the last decade.

Four training sessions in 2011 will bring together experts in the fields of journalism and HIV/AIDS to coach these journalists.

From 30 to 40 investigative reports will be produced by the fellows, and South African new media, broadcast and print outlets will spotlight their reports.

Under the IWMF’s transformative training model, these trained investigative reporters will work with editors and management to improve news reporting on HIV/AIDS.

Key features of the training model include:

* Continuous training

* Buy-in and a commitment of institutional support from top management

* Empowerment of women journalists

* Training provided by journalists and experts with a focus on health and gender issues.

For more information, please contact Roshani Kothari at rkothari@iwmf.org

Covering Poverty and Food Security, 22-23 April, Jhb

Withered bean plants: Farmers in the larger Nakuru area in Rift Valley province have experienced maize and beans crop failure in 2009 due to poor rainfall early in the year. © Jane Some/IRIN

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Workshop objectives

Covering Poverty, Food Security & Social Protection aims to increase and enhance news media coverage of poverty and poverty policy interventions in the Southern African Development Community region.

The workshop is an RHVP initiative, funded by the United Kingdom’s development agency, UKaid.

Cost and Registration

The cost of the workshop is R600.00 excl VAT. Please return the registration form to Samkele Nkabinde at snkabinde@frayintermedia.com or contact her at +27 11 341 0767 to attend.

Download a Microsoft Word registration form to your computer, or a PDF version.

Directions

frayintermedia is in Suite 252 on the second floor of the Dunkeld West Centre, on the corner of Jan Smuts Avenue and Bompas Road. The Fournos bakery is in this centre. Click here for driving directions and a Google Map.


Withered bean plants: Farmers in the larger Nakuru area in Rift Valley province have experienced maize and beans crop failure in 2009 due to poor rainfall early in the year. © Jane Some/IRIN

Withered bean plants: Farmers in the larger Nakuru area in Rift Valley province have experienced maize and beans crop failure in 2009 due to poor rainfall early in the year. © Jane Some/IRIN

Food riots across Africa, sparked by the global economic crisis, have made food security the continent’s most pressing issue. Is your newsroom equipped to cover the issue quickly, intelligently and in depth?

Africa is home to three-quarters of the world’s “ultra-poor”. Food aid may solve their immediate hunger, but longer-term solutions are needed to bolster food security.

Sign up your journalists to the Regional Hunger and Vulnerability Programme’s two-day training workshop on Thursday and Friday 22-23 April in Dunkeld West, Johannesburg.

The Workshop will be facilitated by a veteran journalist who is also an experienced trainer. Journalists will receive coaching on writing stories. Interactive practical sessions will equip journalists to find, plan and write compelling stories on poverty and food security in future.

Programme Day 1

  • Introduction to covering poverty – plus film screening
  • Debate with local experts on how the media covers poverty
  • Introduction to the RHVP, social protection & cash transfers
  • A deeper look into poverty in South Africa and the region
  • Expert on local anti-poverty project
  • Interview opportunities with experts and facilitators

Programme Day 2

  • Generating poverty story ideas
  • Planning stories on poverty
  • Sourcing information on poverty and anti-poverty interventions
  • Questions & answers on the RHVP and anti-poverty interventions
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The workshops are offered in partnership with:

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Phuza Wize round table: 3 March at Sedibeng in Meadowlands, Gauteng

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Phuza Wize_JHb_Round table_650pixwide

09:45-10:00

(15 mins)

REGISTRATION & TEA

10:00-10:15

(15 mins)

WELCOME

Birgit Schwarz (project director, frayintermedia)

10:15-10:30

(15 mins)

KEYNOTE ADDRESS:

Phuza Wize: Why the need for this campaign?

Speaker: Dr Sue Goldstein (senior executive, Soul City Institute)

10:30-11:30

(1 hour)

SEMINAR 1:

Understanding the Link Between Violence and Alcohol Consumption

Expert: Dr Neo Morojele (deputy director, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Unit, South African Medical Research Council)

Facilitator: Birgit Schwarz (project director, frayintermedia)

11:30-11:45

(15 mins)

TEA

11:45-12:30

(45 mins)

SEMINAR 2:

Mapping and sourcing stories on violence and alcohol consumption

Expert: Agnes Shabalala, (representative, Soul City Research Team)

Facilitator: Birgit Schwarz (project director, frayintermedia)

12:30 – 14:00

(1h30mins)

LUNCH & LAUNCH OF THE “PHUZA WIZE” CAMPAIGN

14:00-15:30

(1hr30mins)

Panel Discussion:

Phuza Wize: Are we a Nation of Violent Drinkers?

Facilitator: Ike Phaahla (talk show host, SAfm Midday Live)

Panelists:

Scientist: Dr Neo Morojele (deputy director, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Unit, South African Medical Resesarch Council) on key research findings and intervention strategies

Celebrity: Kabelo Mabalane, on his personal story of alcohol consumption and interpersonal violence

Machismo expert: Desmond Lesejane (deputy director, Sonke Gender Justice Network) on masculinity and alcohol consumption, masculinity and violence

Liquor trader: Saint Madlala (national president, South African Liquor Traders’ Association)

15.30-16:00

CLOSURE AND TEA

Phuza Wize round table: 1 March at the Rainbow in Pinetown KZN

Phuza Wize_Dbn_Round Table_650pixwide

Phuza Wize_Dbn_Round Table_650pixwide

09:30-10:00

(30 mins)

REGISTRATION & TEA

10:00-10:15

(15 mins)

WELCOME

Michael Schmidt (managing director , frayintermedia)

10:15-10:30

(15 mins)

KEYNOTE ADDRESS:

Phuza Wize: Why the need for this campaign?

Speaker: Dr Sue Goldstein (Soul City Alcohol Reduction and Violence Prevention Campaign Manager)

10:30-11:30

(1 hour)

SEMINAR 1: Understanding the Link Between Violence and Alcohol Consumption

Experts: Prof Charles Parry (director, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Unit, South African Medical Research Council)

 Facilitator: Michael Schmidt (managing director, frayintermedia)

11:30-11:45

(15 mins)

TEA

11:45-12:45

(1 hour)

SEMINAR 2: 

Mapping and sourcing stories on violence and  alcohol consumption

Expert: Agnes Shabalala, (representative, Soul City Research Team)

Facilitator: Michael Schmidt (managing director, frayintermedia)

12:45 – 13:30

(45 mins)

LUNCH

13:30-15:30

(2 hrs)

Panel Discussion:

Phuza Wize: Are we a Nation of Violent Drinkers?

Facilitator: Kieno Kammies (talk show host, Talk Radio 702)

Panelists:  

Scientist: Prof Charles Parry (director, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Unit, South African Medical Research Council) on key research findings and intervention strategies

Celebrities: Kabelo Mabalane (on his personal story of alcohol consumption and interpersonal violence)

                 Steve Hamilton (recovering alcoholic and author of the book I Want My Life Back) on his personal story of alcohol consumption and interpersonal violence)

Machismo expert: Mbuyiselo Botha (co-director, Sonke Gender Justice Network) on masculinity and alcohol consumption, masculinity and violence

Liquor trader: Saint Madlala (national president, South African Liquor Traders’ Association)

15.30-16:00

 CLOSURE AND TEA

 

 

 

 

 

Are we a nation of violent drinkers? Soul City launches Phuza Wize

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Whatever your answer, the available research paints a horrifying picture:

More than half of the victims of non-fatal and fatal violence test positive for alcohol in urban areas. Most violence-related deaths occur on Saturdays and Sundays, when binge drinking is common. Binge drinking is defined as having 5 or more drinks in a day. Alcohol is involved in nearly half of the cases of family violence.

Soul City is launching the Phuza Wize campaign to address the significant link between alcohol, violence and risky behaviour in South Africa.

Resources for journalists

PhuzaWize_Campaign_frontpage

Presentation: Why and what of Phuza Wize campaign

 

 

 

 

PhuzaWize_YouWillRockTheWorld_frontpage

 

Presentation: Understanding the role of alcohol in communities, Soul City research

 

 

 

PhuzaWize_CharlesParryPresentation_frontpage 

Presentation: The link between alcohol and violence, Prof Parry of the MRC

 

 

 

PhuzaWize_Alcohol_LiteratureReview_Frontpage

 

Review: Research on alcohol use, Medical Research Council (MRC) 

 

 

 

Phuza Wize kicked off with two round tables open to all interested parties in Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal:

Monday 1 March at the Rainbow Restaurant in Pinetown, Durban:

Speakers

Wednesday 3 March at Sedibeng Shebeen in Meadowlands, Soweto

Programme

Speakers

How violent are our drinking habits?

South Africans consume over 5 billion litres of alcoholic beverages per year according to a report by the Cape Town based Medical Research Council (MRC). This amounts to 120 litres per capita per year. Taking into account that many South Africans do not drink at all, the alcohol consumption of those who do is amongst the highest in the world.

As research has shown a significant link between alcohol, violence and risky behaviour, the Soul City Institute, renowned for its campaigns to create positive social change, has embarked on a campaign aimed at curbing violence and HIV infections by reducing alcohol consumption and promoting safe drinking places.

The campaign

Soul City has hired respected media consultancy frayintermedia to create greater public awareness for the campaign, its goals and issues through the media. The campaign, which begins in March in tandem with the launch of the TV drama Soul City 10 on SABC2, is part of a five-year programme to reduce access to alcohol and thus curb incidences of violence and risky behaviour in South Africa.

Some of the main aims of the campaign are to:
  • Reduce and restrict access to alcohol.
  • Promote the creation, accreditation and monitoring of safe drinking spaces.
  • Promote the creation of alcohol-free zones, such as primary and high schools.
  • Promote legislative and ethical compliance by liquor traders.
  • Increase community knowledge on the harmful effects of alcohol and its contribution to violent behaviour and HIV infection.

The role of the media will be critical if the campaign is to reach as many South Africans as possible through newspapers, magazines, radio and TV. The response by the media has been excellent so far, with several leading companies giving support to this important initiative and others set to join soon.

For the media

Soul City will offer its media partners several services to ensure informed reporting and discussion of the campaign messages:

  • Two Media Round Tables were hosted, one in Durban on March 1 and the other in Johannesburg on March 3, at which experts briefed invited journalists and lead discussion of the campaign along with local celebrities and shebeen owners.
  • A resource kit for journalists, to be distributed as a PDF, including briefing documents, research and story ideas.
  • A monthly PDF newsletter (March to June) focusing on topics related to the campaign.
  • A news and feature service which will provide selected media outlets with stories written by leading journalists.
Help us to change South Africa for the better by getting on board

To RSVP to this event email Samkele Nkabinde of frayintermedia on snkabinde@frayintermedia.com or call on 011 341 0767

Newspapers learning in community

How can small community newspapers and magazines be made viable? Delegates from several provinces, sponsored by the Media Development and Diversity Agency (MDDA), will be pooling their experiences and ideal solutions at a two-day workshop.

 frayintermedia’s Michael Schmidt will be a speaker at the forum for community media on February 11 and 12, convened by the MDDA, the Government agency mandated to assist “historically disadvantaged communities and persons not adequately served by the media to gain access to the media”.

 For small media, keeping their heads above financial water is a major challenge. Issues such as revenue generation, cash flow, managing the relationship with clients, printing and distribution, and sales and marketing will be debated in depth.

 frayintermedia conducted feasibility studies for some of the media now sponsored by the MDDA. Examples are Agenda Magazine in Mafikeng and Penopele News, a community newspaper in North West. Agenda Magazine and Penopele News are unusual publications, as both are bilingual, published in seTswana and English. Both operate in areas with seTswana radio stations, but no other source of printed seTswana content.

Alex Pioneer, a community newspaper distributed in Alexandra in Gauteng, will be another attendee at the event. Sponsored by the MDDA, frayintermedia mentored Alex Pioneer during weekly visits for six months in 2009.

Training government journalists – being fair, accurate and balanced

frayintermedia’s Michael Schmidt conducted a two-day workshop on “Online to print” for government journalists on February 4 and 5.

GCIS, the Government Communication Information System, approached frayintermedia to provide training to a group of their journalists who work for BuaNews, the Government news agency. These journalists work mostly online, but needed to acquire skills in writing for print. The course included understanding the media landscape in South Africa, understanding the reasons for tensions that have developed between the government and the media, and the legal environment journalists operate in.

During the workshop some basic journalism skills were refined. The GCIS journalists’ brief is to report on what Government does, but that needs to be done in a fair, balanced and accurate manner conforming to journalistic standards – even when covering controversial stories touching on the personal lives of Government figures.

Award-winning author Adam Hochschild and Prof. Anton Harber at the 2008 Narrative Journalism Conference

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Fred Khumalo and Mark Gevisser in conversation at the 2008 Narrative Journalism Conference

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frayintermedia’s Michael Schmidt with students at “Conflict in transitional societies” Mexico 2009

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